Is it becoming more difficult to be gay in Senegal? // Est-il de plus en plus difficile d’être gay au Sénégal?

Photo © Ernst Coppejans/Dans le Milieu

Photo © Ernst Coppejans/Dans le Milieu

Nick Diamond shares some of his experiences as a gay American studying in Dakar:

“We feared the case of Ebola in the neighborhood next to mine.  And even when I was tested for malaria, nothing proved to be more challenging than living as a gay student in Dakar. I wouldn’t have survived there without my running shoes and a black pen.  Jogging along the Atlantic Ocean and journaling in my notebook allowed me to catch a break from hiding in the closet – again.”

Read the full article on albionpleiad.com


The contrast between these two articles by Miz Cracker (published a year apart) speaks to the increasing difficulty of being gay in Senegal:

Published February 2014:

“A gay boy chasing love in West Africa—considering my reputation as a foul-mouthed drag queen, my friends didn’t think it was a good idea. But in early February, I did it anyway. I took time off from my nightmare job, packed lash curlers and a Summer’s Eve douche, and went to see a boy in Dakar. I wanted to forget what I’d heard about the recent anti-gay violence in Senegal, Cameroon, and Nigeria; I wanted to start living my damn life. But even as I boarded my plane, I still wondered: Would a homo like me—one who wears a hint of makeup even when she’s out of drag—be safe on ‘the most homophobic continent’ on earth?”

Read the full article on slate.com

Published February 2015:

“Last year, I wrote an optimistic article for Outward about homophobia in West Africa. Drawing on my own experiences traveling in Senegal as a gay boy and undercover drag queen, I wanted to test American perceptions of the region against the reality. I described how my sexuality was acknowledged and accepted, at least on a personal level, and how diplomatic pressure from President Barack Obama was sparking a new conversation about gay rights in the area. I saw potential for change. There was reason for hope.”

Read the full article on slate.com

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